CopyLeaks AI Content Detector Review (2023): Does It Work?

CopyLeaks AI is an AI content detector that recognizes human-like AI-written text.

Thanks to the latest AI advancements, there are a ton of new AI writing tools on the market. These AI tools turn simple text inputs into full-on text chapters like emails, blog posts, or promotional texts. It’s hard to tell by the naked eye whether the AI content is written by AI or not.

With the giant leaps in AI technology, there’s an increasing concern about the originality of AI-generated content. Besides, search engines like Google don’t like AI-generated content due to the lack of unique views and original research. Simply put, AI-written content doesn’t provide readers and search engines any value.

To remedy these issues, some companies have developed AI detection tools. These tools can detect AI-written content with decent accuracy even though the content seems like human-written.

This is a comprehensive review of the CopyLeaks AI content detector. I tested the tool with both AI-written and human-written content. Besides, I tried to fool the detector with some easy tricks.

💡 Make sure to read my comprehensive guide to the Best AI Content Detectors.

Let’s jump into it!

What Is the CopyLeaks AI Detector?

CopyLeaks AI is an AI content detector that recognizes AI-written content with decent probability.

The working principle is simple:

  1. Copy-paste text to CopyLeaks editor.
  2. Run the scan.
  3. See the originality score.

But because of the high-quality AI content, it might seem impossible to have a tool to classify the text as AI-written. Let’s put the CopyLeaks AI detector to the test to see if it actually works.

Performance

To test the CopyLeaks AI performance, I’ll feed the tool 10 human-written text samples and 10 AI-written samples. More specifically, I took:

  • 10 random human-written text samples from my blog.
  • 10 AI-generated samples of text that I produced with ChatGPT.

Let’s start by feeding the tool some human-generated text.

1. Human-Generated Content

In this section, I input parts of my blog posts into the CopyLeaks AI detector. In each section, I’ve highlighted whether the tool detected the content successfully or not.

In an ideal world, CopyLeaks AI should identify all of the pieces as human-written.

Let’s start the tests.

Example 1

Falsely identified as AI-written—mission failed.

Example 2

Falsely identified as AI-written—mission failed.

Example 3

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 4

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 5

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 6

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 7

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 8

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 9

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

Example 10

Correctly identified as human-written—mission succeeded.

CopyLeaks AI correctly detected 8/10 human-written samples as human-written.

This is impressive, although the sample size is small with only 10 text samples. To get more accurate results, you’d have to do an order of magnitude more tests.

But with this data already, you can tell the AI detector makes some mistakes and is by no means reliable.

So if you’re given a text chapter or blog posts, you can’t truly rely on CopyLeaks AI.

But depending on your use case, this might not be an issue. Many people use AI detectors to edit their content until it no longer looks AI-written.

2. AI-Written Content

I believe most authors use AI content detectors to help edit their AI-written content until it appears human-written.

This is why it’s more important to see how the CopyLeaks AI Detector performs with AI-written text samples.

Here are the results of inputting 10 AI-written text samples into CopyLeaks AI.

Example 1

Falsely identified as human-written—mission failed.

Example 2

Correctly identified as AI-written—mission succeeded.

Example 3

Correctly identified as AI-written—mission succeeded.

Example 4

Falsely identified as human-written—mission failed.

Example 5

Correctly identified as AI-written—mission succeeded.

Example 6

Falsely identified as human-written—mission failed.

Example 7

Falsely identified as human-written—mission failed.

Example 8

Correctly identified as AI-written—mission succeeded.

Example 9

Falsely identified as human-written—mission failed.

Example 10

Correctly identified as AI-written—mission succeeded.

That didn’t go so well.

The AI only detected 5/10 AI-written pieces as AI-written.

So if you use ChatGPT, there’s only about a 50% chance of getting caught by CopyLeaks AI. Keep in mind the sample size is small with only 10 pieces of text, so you’d need more rigorous testing to get a more reliable result of accuracy.

However, if 5/10 tests fail, you can already draw a conclusion that the AI detector doesn’t really work.

Can You Trick the AI Content Detector?

Last but not least, let’s play some cheap tricks on the CopyLeaks AI detector to see if we can fool it

I’m going to use this piece of AI-written text as the input by making some small changes to it.

Test 1: Remove a Comma

➡️ TLDR; Removing 1 comma fooled the detector completely.

When testing AI content detectors, I’ve noticed that some of the tools are quite easy to fool. With a single character change or typo, the tool might change its opinion from 0% human-generated to 100% human-generated.

Obviously, this is not ideal. If you change a single character or add a single word, that shouldn’t really affect the result.

Let’s try removing the comma that follows the word “Additionally” and see what happens:

As a result, removing a single comma made the tool think this AI-written text sample is human text.

Test 2: Make a Typo

➡️ TLDR; Removing a single letter completely changed the detector’s mind.

As another test, let’s see what happens when I remove a single character from the AI-written text.

For example, I’ll remove the letter “i” from “their”:

Once again, the AI detector changed its mind from AI-written to human text.

Test 3: Use an AI Paraphraser

➡️ TLDR; rewording the AI-written text fooled AI detector bad.

Last but not least, let’s try rewording the AI-written text. I’m using an AI paraphrasing tool called Quillbot. With QuillBot, it takes about 2-3 seconds to reword the entire chapter of the text.

If you pay attention to the reworded text, it looks decent. But parts of it look very bot-like and you don’t even need an AI detector to be suspicious about the content.

Anyway, let’s input this reworded AI-paraphrased sample into CopyLeaks AI:

And once more, these quick changes completely turned the AI detector around.

Pros

  • Free. CopyLeaks AI is free to use. This makes it accessible and effortless to give it a try. Also, the UI is super simple.
  • Detects human written text decently. Based on my experiences, CopyLeaks can decently classify human-written text as human-written. It makes some mistakes, though.

Cons

  • Doesn’t detect AI-written content. When it comes to detecting AI-written content, CopyLeaks doesn’t really work. In my case, it detected only 50% of the AI-written samples as AI-written.
  • Easy to fool. You can fool the detector by removing or replacing a single character.

Final Verdict

CopyLeaks AI doesn’t detect modern AI-written content. I’m sure this tool was great when models like ChatGPT didn’t exist.

But it doesn’t seem to pick up ChatGPT-generated content which is a big minus as most AI-written stuff these days is generated with ChatGPT.

And to be fair, none of the AI detectors I’ve tried really work that well. Some have 90% accuracy, though. But that’s way too little to be a completely reliable tool.

To put it short, I would try another AI content detector tool like Originality.ai to get better results.

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